Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Kimberley Reserve, Chirnside Park

This reserve is on the urban fringe of eastern Melbourne. It is probably most recognised locally as the home of the local footy and cricket clubs with two ovals at its southern end. A chain of man-made ponds extends northwards fed by storm water drainage. The reserve has a crushed gravel walking trail along both sides of the wetlands. This is well utilised by walkers with dogs - a good 50% of which were off-lead during my visit (despite signage making it clear that this was prohibited).

The eremaea list impressed me so I was bound to be disappointed of course! However nice views of this White-plumed honeyeater as well as sightings of Hardhead lifted the spirits (which weren't really all that low given it was a spankingly sunny winter's afternoon!).



It's good to see Australasian grebe getting their colour back making them easier to differentiate from their Hoary-headed counterparts!

Kings in Grass Castles
I was intrigued by these clumps of reeds. Are they planted that way or are they growing naturally. The Purple swamphen loved them
Hardhead and Grey teal

Purple swamphen Porphyrio porphyrio
Little pied cormorant
Large block residential living in Chirnside Park - where the suburbs are taking over the paddocks
Each pond had a low wall and covered drain
Urban fringe - Google Maps satellite image of Kimberley Reserve

Sharing with Wild Bird Wednesday


Bird on!

12 comments:

  1. Another great post, Pete!!
    That White-plumed Honeyeater is gorgeous.

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  2. Wonderful series!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  3. Wonderful photos. I love the honeyeater, it's a very pretty bird.

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  4. Hi Pete Fantastic sets of shots especially the 1st Honeyeater. Stunning

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  5. Hi Pete, great photos and interesting to see what survives in the Melbourne suburbs. We don't really see that Honeyeater here in Brisbane, though we have our northern varieties filling that ecological role. Eremaea often gets my hopes up too, but it works out once in a while! :-)

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    1. It is a great little website Christian

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  6. wouldn't it be lovely to live overlooking the ponds with great access to viewing the feathered visitors. I love the little grebes. Great post Pete

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    1. Thanks Carole! When I see the large expanses of lawn I'd be tempted to plant a bit of habitat as well!
      Dreamin'

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  7. So mice to see my home birds on your blog. The only one that thankfully only a visitor here, is the purple swamphen and for that I am grateful as they tend to feast on ducklings and the progeny of grebes.

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    1. Good heavens! I didn't know that about the swamphen!

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